The Significance of the Slate and Stylus

Are you familiar with the slate and stylus? With so many advances in technology, some tend to think that the use of this portable device for Braille note taking is a thing of the past. Katherine Watson believes otherwise. From taking notes in college, to creating to-do lists while on the bus, Katherine shares passionately why she believes the slate and stylus is a handy tool still useful for modern purposes.

Blind Faith

Has anyone ever told you that you couldn’t do something because of your lack of sight? Ericka Short explains the impact mentors and a supportive faith community have had on her throughout her life. She regularly volunteers in her church, teaching, reading and advocating for people with disabilities, giving tips and tricks for how you can, too.

Katherine Schneider is joined by two of her “Blindness 101” students on a walk through a neighborhood of houses on a cool spring day. As they walk down the sidewalk, one young lady is blindfolded and using a white cane. Not far behind her is Kathie, her guide dog besides her. The second student, with her blindfold removed and held in her hand, observes from the grass adjacent to the sidewalk.

Blindness 101: Two Hours to Gain a Bit of Understanding

In response to the question, “What is it like to be blind?,” Katherine Schneider has developed Blindness 101. This practical and fun simulation of the blindness experience leaves learners with a realistic impression of not only the challenges of being blind, but also the useful adaptive techniques employed by blind people.

Annika Konrad and her new husband walk hand in hand across an open field towards a lush, green row of trees. As the sunshine bares down, the pair casts long shadows behind them. Annika wears a white lace gown that features a deep v down her back and a train that follows behind her. To the couple’s left in the distance is a rustic red barn. In the blue sky hovers only a faint spattering of puffy white clouds.

Learning to Love Without the Visual Details

In “Learning to Love without the Details,” Annika Konrad reflects on the visual nature of planning her wedding. Between navigating and delegating decisions about wedding colors, wedding party attire and invitation font, Annika wonders: Will her visual impairment keep her from enjoying the big day?

Parochial Perils

From having to lug around large print books to being teased about having the front row seat in class, memoirist Dan Sullivan chronicles in relatable fashion the bullying and blessings he received while a student losing his vision attending St. Joe’s in rural Wisconsin. He writes about the hope the prayers of the Sisters gave him when he found out he had macular degeneration, an incurable eye condition.